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"... on the Mind"

By modefor, Apr 6 2020 09:57AM

I’ve written about the importance of resilience a lot… and I will continue to do so! But today I thought I’d give you a quick Resilience High-5.


Resilience is not just strength, but the ability to be stretched and then return to form… (think Elastigirl from The Incredibles – one of my heroes because she is resilient AF!)


Resilience is the ability to be flexible, to bounce back, to manage stress, to cope positively and to keep going regardless of what you’re faced with. It is buoyancy (I guess with an ass like Elastigirl’s you’d be particularly buoyant?!).


Resilience is the power to return to form after being bent, compressed and stretched, mentally and physically.


The more resilient you become, the stronger you feel and vice versa.


This is why working on your mental (and physical) resilience is so important for your health and wellbeing. Being mentally resilient, flexible, stretchy, malleable, whatever word, you want to use, will stand you in good stead. You will deal with personal, financial and professional issues much better.


Being resilient will help you learn and flourish from situations and not be broken by them.


Being resilient will help with your mental health and help you be stronger for others.


You can read about more ways to develop your resilience in my article “Coping Strategies for Anxiety” on my “… On the Mind” blog, but for now, here’s my Resilience High-5.


• Reflect

• Time-out

• Focus

• Create

• Move


Reflect

Look at what you’ve got through already in your life; if you’re reading this now then that means you’ve got through some stuff so you are already resilient. Appreciate that and be grateful for all you’ve achieved.

Once you look back at things you can change the narrative going forwards; in effect you can choose not only how to live your life, but choose your mindset and how you respond and act to situations without reacting.

You can face your fears, release regrets, cultivate forgiveness of yourself and others you feel may have done wrong to you and you can learn the lessons to help you develop your strength and resilience.


Time-out

Taking time-out from the busy world, both online and physically, is a good thing. Don’t keep doing things out of habit or impulse.

It is OK and great to do nothing sometimes; we don’t always have to be striving forwards. Being mindful of what’s going on right now and slowing down is good for your mind, body and spirit.

Take time-out for your mental and physical health and to digest what you have learned from your reflection. If things aren’t always working for you, taking a break can really help and don’t be afraid to make changes.


Focus

Reflection done, time-out taken, now it’s time to focus on how you have got through the tough things so far and how you can develop those skills.

Show yourself plenty of self-compassion and pass that empathy and self-compassion on to others.

Focus on yourself and what you need for your optimum mental and physical health and wellbeing. This is about you and what works for you. Don’t be afraid if it’s different to the needs of others. This is about you and doing the things you love and that make you feel good.

From walking to meditating, cooking to music, finding new and old things you love to do are therapy for the soul.


Create

Creating and being creative are important for confidence, flexibility and happiness to name just a few reasons.

You have the means to create yourself, your life, what and how you do things and you shouldn’t be shy of ‘re-doing’ you at any time. Passions and values change as we learn and grow, so create yourself as you go along.

Create a plan of what you want, what you need and how you can implement that and combined with an element of letting things ‘be’ and ‘happen’, you can really bump up your resilience levels.

Having a creative outlet will also help you gain confidence to be the best version of you which you can love.


Move

With your armoury of developed skills, it’s time to move.

Literal physical movement will help to give your mind clarity, improve your wellbeing and mental and physical health but it’s also time to move in a different way; forwards with your life.

There is no speed guidance for this, as long as the direction is forwards, you do you and move at your speed to achieve the satisfaction that you need and want.


It’s your life on your terms. Work on your resilience and you can navigate life and all its ups and downs with a little more confidence and ease.


Want to chat about your resilience more? Message me for a short 1-2-1 power call.


Much Love

Tabby xxx





By modefor, Apr 4 2020 09:56AM

As we prepare to enter week three of the COVID-19 lockdown here in the UK, some people have settled into a new routine nicely, whilst others are struggling to mentally deal with the constraints of isolation and the lack of freedom.


That mood swing, that moment of judgement of the words or actions of someone else when they are actually just supporting others, that feeling of calmness, that moment of frustration? Familiar? Let me introduce you to your mental health.


We all have mental health; that is something that connects us all and now, more than ever our feelings and emotions will be constantly fluctuating and that will have a direct correlation to the positioning on our personal mental health continuum, which will be ever changing, but there are things we can do to support our own mental health.


This week, one of the best things we can do is get involved with some of the amazing free events both on and off-line which can support our mental health by giving our mood a boost, getting us moving and making us part of a fun and appreciative group of likeminded people.


Here’s a suggestion of five things you can plan and do for free next week to support your mental health during week three of lockdown.


1. The Virtual Piano Bar

Monday to Saturday evenings from 6-8pm you can join the incredible professional pianist Nigel Wears in his Virtual Piano Bar, direct from his home!


Music has huge positive benefits on wellbeing and this is two hours of incredible piano playing and sing-a-longs of popular melodies, complete with lyrics if you need them and you can make requests.


The regular clientele are warm and welcoming and the ambience is laid back, easy going and a great break from the reality of the outside world with lots of easy going chat and ‘happy banter’.


You can drop Nigel a few pounds in his virtual tip jar to show your appreciation as you would if you were in a real piano bar, and if you join on Tuesday nights you can be part of some amazing charity fundraising too, which, in the last two weeks has raised nearly £700 for two charities, the Salvation Army Foodbank and the NHS frontline staff at Leeds Teaching Hospitals via the charity Leeds Cares.


The next charity nights are Tuesday 7th and 14th


Nigel is not only a first-class musician but an incredibly generous and kind-hearted soul and his music will entertain you and send your mind some much needed calming vibes.


Check out (and like) his page, schedule the date in your diary and join the musical fun at: www.facebook.com/nigelwearspianist


2. Somewhere Over the Rainbow

Assuming you’re not showing signs of any COVID-19 symptoms or physically struggling in any other way (in which case please take stringent self-isolation measures and stay safe and protect others too), you are possibly taking your regular daily constitutional around your local area (and please stay local).


Whilst out and about, take the opportunity to look up and around and spot some of the thousands of pictures of rainbows which have been placed in windows for people to enjoy.


A sign of hope and solidarity, they bring a smile to your face.


Why don’t you get your colouring pencils out too and find your inner artist to add to the joy for other people. The process of drawing is a good therapy and bringing a smile to someone else’s face is definitely gratifying and good for the soul.


3. Word Power

Books and reading are a huge boost for mental wellbeing. Whether it’s a good novel, autobiography or self-help manual, books can give us the words and boost our mind needs.


The audiobook platform Audible has said that, for as long as schools are shut, anyone can listen to a vast range of audiobooks for free so you can get yourself some good titles there without having to turn a page!


Also, if you tap into Amazon ‘free Kindle books’ you’ll find some free titles for Kindle.


Why not get together with friends online via Zoom, WhattsApp or Houseparty and set-up a book club where you all read or listen to the same book and then chat about it.


Even better, get creative, get writing and find your inner storyteller. As a breed, humans have always historically been storytellers. Put your stories on the page and bring them to life for yourself and others to enjoy.


4. Games Night!

A good thing that has come out of the COVID-19 lockdown is the increase in positive online social communication, whereby family and friends who live near and far apart are hooking-up online to hang out, chat and make sure they feel socially connected.


You don’t just need to limit your online sessions to chat though; you can turn it into a games night!


Quizzes and karaoke work well, as do board games such as Trivial Pursuit or other trivia games to give your mind a little work out.


If you’re a fan of the mildly inappropriate and often play Cards Against Humanity then you can check out this version called ‘Remote Insensitivity’ which you can play online with friends at http://playingcards.io/game/remote-insensitivity


Anything that brings a feeling of social connection and an opportunity for laughter is good for the soul and seeing faces into that bargain gives us a sense of connection and ‘normality.’


5. We’re Going on a Bear Hunt!

Trying to keep your own mind in check and entertain the kids? Then why not combine the two on your daily walk?


As well as looking for rainbows, why not keep your eyes open for some bears too?


There’s a nationwide bear hunt on; they’re getting up to all sorts of fun stuff in people’s windows and gardens, so make sure you keep your eyes peeled.


Why not pop a bear in your window too to help keep the children (and adults!) entertained?


***


So, there you have it; five of my suggestions to schedule and try out next week during lockdown that will help support your mental health and wellbeing. There are plenty more ideas though and I could go on for ages with recommendations (such as a day at Chester Zoo, online concerts and music rehearsals, free musicals and more), but just have a little search online yourself or ask a neighbour whilst out on your daily walk (from a safe and acceptable 2m distance of course!).


Whatever you do, make sure you do something every day that supports your mental health and wellbeing and together we will get through this and be stronger for it.


Most importantly, keep communicating, keep talking and keep sharing the highs and the lows. We are all in this together.


Much Love, stay home, stay safe and keep smiling

Tabby xxx


Ps. If you want something to read then you can download the digital PDF version of my book 'The Three

Ps: Possibility, Productivity & Performance' for just £2.99 at https://sowl.co/g1Fc2 or for something amazing to listen to, download the digital version of the album ‘Lago’ at http://modeforpublishing.com/audio/4594750000. Both are great for the mind and spirit!



By modefor, Mar 31 2020 08:12AM


*** Trigger warnings: reference to death & suicide ***


I’ve titled this editorial ‘The Art of Grief’ because, having experienced, thought and spoken about the subject in some depth and for some time now, I’ve come to the conclusion that grief is like a work of art.


It’s messy and unique, it’s sometimes difficult to understand, it’s striking and bold or subtle and unclear and sometimes it’s utterly beautiful and full of love. The understanding and feeling of grief, like art, is personal to the person viewing and experiencing it. None of us will ever experience, live or feel it in the same way.


“I get the messy and difficult but how is grief beautiful?” I hear you ask. No, I’m not completely delusional, but most of the time I choose to embrace my grief as one of the most beautiful things I have in my life. It is every moment and every memory and expression of love and happiness that paints the most vivid pictures that bring a smile and an overwhelming feeling of love and gratitude. That is beautiful; the memories and the reflection of all that was and still is amazing.


Grief is something that we will all experience at some point in our life and sadly, as we witness the global pandemic of COVID-19 and are faced daily with news of death and loss of people we both know and complete strangers, we witness how grief becomes a reality for us all.


COVID-19 has not only changed our way of life, but the way of death too. Here in the UK, we are living in a world where no loved ones can be at the hospital bedside of those in pain and dying and limits of five people at a funeral.


For those losing loved ones during this time of global uncertainty and lockdown, my heart breaks for you. I have so much gratitude for the fact that I could hold my husband until he took his very last breath; I could reassure him and tell him I love him.


He too died in the same way as many victims of Coronavirus; not from the cancer he had fought but the complications that led to ARDS (Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome). It was a heart-breaking battle with oxygen (the necessity that keeps us alive and breathing) that he couldn’t overcome and the ventilators and oxygen just weren’t enough. He was weak and compromised, but he had me by his side.


Regardless of how someone dies, whatever our experience or our loss, the emotions and feelings are real, strong, unique and personal.


I’m not just talking about grief as a consequence of death from a virus though. Millions of people, like me, are already living with grief and many will experience the death of friends and family during this time of lockdown due to natural causes, other illnesses, accident and suicide.


Factor into this that death is not the only way to experience grief and you soon see that so many of us are experiencing something that is still a taboo subject and yet no one wants to talk about it; but you know me… I’ll start the conversations about grief and mental health and any other taboo subject because it’s important, it’s necessary and by talking we can better understand, empathise and support ourselves and others.


By lifting the mask on our grief, we show a beautiful honesty that can truly help, support and strengthen others.


So how else can we experience grief if it’s not always about death?


It could be the loss of a job, work or a business, a relationship or a pet. It could be the consequence of not being able to do the things and see the people you love due to lockdown. It could be the feeling of isolation and loneliness; the loss of your lifestyle and routine as you know it and the not being able to be there for others as you once had.


Today, as a self-employed business owner in an economically unstable climate I can also feel the pressure mounting to not lose my business; the possibility and pressure is real and if my business didn’t make it, I know I would mourn and grieve the loss for years to come. The thought that every moment of hard work I had put in over the last 12 years, every part of the legacy of my husband and all he worked hard for just gone? It doesn’t bear thinking about.


There are so many ways you can experience grief and right now, as the world is on lockdown, maybe more people than ever are experiencing the emotional rollercoaster that is grief.


Now add that feeling onto the shoulders of those living with grief following death and you can see why, for the benefit of better mental health, we need to be talking more about this subject.


This is why I’m happy to talk honestly based on my personal experience and also share with you a few ways I found that can help us to help ourselves whilst we settle into co-habitation with grief.


Five Tips for Living with Grief


• Keep talking and sharing: open, honest, non-judgemental conversation not only makes us feel better, but empathy and sharing experiences can help others to both understand and know they are not alone.


• Allow yourself to feel your emotions: you will experience everything from happiness to sadness, frustration, anger, anxiety, joy, love, pain and so much more, often within the space of the same minute. Embrace those feelings and feel them in all the weirdness, inappropriateness and confusing ways they fire at you. This is good and normal to feel something.


• Build your resilience: I honestly believe you don’t ever get over grief; it doesn’t go away, but instead it becomes a part of us which we embrace, manage and co-exist with. Whilst you accept it won’t go away, work on building resilience which will be your key to managing and living with it day-to-day harmoniously.


• Don’t feel guilt or shame: you must NEVER feel guilt or shame for feeling your emotions and living with grief or your response to grief, regardless of why you are grieving or how long you have been experiencing it. There are no rules, boundaries or timescales. Your experience is unique to you, but building your resilience will help massively improve your response to grief and how you continue to move forwards at the same time as learning to live with it.


• Love yourself: yes, learn to love yourself exactly as you are. This means being kind to yourself, looking after yourself and becoming resilient and strong to be the happiest version of yourself even in the times that feel hardest. Focus on the things that are good for you and don’t be concerned with the uninvited opinion of others.


There isn’t a day that goes by when I don’t think about and feel a whole ocean of emotions following the deaths of my husband, my Dad, my brother, my pets my friends, other family and complete strangers but alongside the pain and sadness there is so much love, beauty and gratitude and this is what I hold on to; what makes me smile and creates my happiness.


Grief, in any form and for any reason, is cruel. It is an emotional baseball bat with a mind of its own and by hell, it knows how to take a massive swipe when we least expect it. We can’t control it, but we can control our response to it and that is going to be the single action that helps you manage it; controlling your response.


Grief is, and will be, a part of all our lives; let’s just talk about it, make it less taboo and in the process help ourselves be less scared and try instead to see and focus on the beauty, happiness and love of memories that paint the art of grief.


Much Love

Tabby xxx


If you need or want to talk my virtual door is always open. Just visit www.modefor.co.uk or www.facebook.com/modefor


Further support is available from:

The Samaritans - phone 116 123

Cruse Bereavement Care – phone 0808 808 1677




By modefor, Mar 29 2020 10:47AM

Here in the UK we have reached our first weekend of the enforced lockdown due to COVID-19.

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You may well have just made it through your first week working from home whilst entertaining the kids, or your first week of being home alone, so well done! Be proud of yourself.

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Now, as it goes, I’m a bit of a pro at this lockdown malarkey and working from home as I’ve been self-employed working alone from the comfort of my own surroundings for the last 20 years!

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I also feel like I’ve spent the last 16 months self-isolating following the death of my husband… so, yes! I have the skills of resiliency and putting your mental health first in order to get through some really shitty stuff!

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Actually, side note, I was just at the point where I thought I might start getting out and about more and hitting the world socially again when the world said: “hey! Not today…social isolation for you!” Should I read anything into this?

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Anyhow, I want to share with you some of my tips for surviving the lockdown (whether this is your first soirée into working from home, your first time being home alone or being separated from those you love) which put a strong focus on your mental health, because good mental health is what we all need to focus on right now, as well as keeping good physical health…. Yes peeps… wash your hands and stay at home. So, here goes:


Plan your day: routine will give you self-confidence & will help with productivity.


Move more: Not only does exercise keep you fit, it helps with your wellbeing and sleep.


Nutrition for the mind, body and spirit: staying hydrated and eating nutritiously are vital for good health and they also have a massive impact on your mental health too. Now, there will be days when all we need is a bottle of red wine and some mini eggs and that’s cool; do that, just don’t make it every day. Feed your mind, body and spirit with every bit of nutrition it needs to stay fit and healthy and boost your mood. We all know that too much red wine and mini eggs makes you feel crap.


Relaxation techniques: Find what does it for you as a good relaxation technique helps with anxiety and sleep. It could be mindfulness, meditation, reading, listening to music, cooking, dancing, yoga… could be anything which works for YOU.


Creativity: Find something new or existing to do that uses your creative brain. Engaging some creativity in what and how we do things can be a massive boost for our minds.


Reflection: The world is a crazy place right now and there are many situations we can’t control, so focus on what you can control to feel more grounded and calm. Being grateful for the positive things is a powerful tool in your armoury right now. Gratitude brings a sense of calm and security and you can ether take a few moments to think about what you’re grateful for each day or write them down, then, when times feel tough, you can have a read of what you’ve written and it can really help.


Take time out: We all need time out for ourselves; whether that is to sit and think, enjoy our hobbies or try something new. If you are alone, you still need to take time out for your own headspace and if you’re at home with several people, make sure you all take time for yourselves, in a separate room, just some privacy and space for you. We need this for our own sanity and mental health and just five minutes away from the family can really benefit your health and wellbeing.


Stay connected: Working from home and self-isolation can be a huge strain on our mental health and loneliness is a very real problem for many. We keep being told to socially distance ourselves from each other. I think this is a poor choice of words and we need a mindset tweak and to use better language. Yes, we ABSOLUTELY MUST physically distance ourselves in order to beat this pandemic BUT we need to focus on being more socially engaging with each other (in safe ways) for better mental health. So, a big yes to ‘phone calls, texts, video chats and the use of online platforms and apps such as Zoom, Facetime, WhattsApp and Houseparty. Now more than ever we need to get talking and keep communicating with each other and you can be creative with this organising online events and meet-ups, but connect with people daily.


Mental health is a very individual experience and right now our mental health is being tested to the max, so it’s hugely important for us to build resilience.


The above ideas will help you build that resilience to stay strong during lockdown which will then be strong and positive habits you have put in place for life going forwards and supporting your own mental health.


Resilience is key and your having good mental health is vital.


If you want to work on your resilience skills you can join me on my Focus & Flex event on Monday 6th April. Details are here: www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/focus-flex-tickets-100811225088


If you need more support my virtual door is always open or you can seek further support from organisations such as the Samaritans by calling 116123


Much Love

Tabby xxx



By modefor, Mar 29 2020 10:45AM

As I write this, the world is experiencing something completely unprecedented as it faces the unknown quantity that is COVID-19.


Many people are in self-isolation, working from home, looking after children as schools are closed, cancelling events for the foreseeable future and businesses are closed and struggling.


It is worrying times and worry can lead to anxiety for everyone and if you already live with anxiety or other mental health issues, these times have never been tougher.


We all have mental health which works on a continuum; sometimes our mental health is good and sometimes it’s not and we can slide to any point on that scale at any moment of any day.


The current climate is giving people more awareness of their own mental health as the worry and reality of COVID-19 hits.


Overwhelm and anxiety are something that can easily affect us all, but there are things we can do to help ourselves both generally and in specifically at this time.


I’ve put together a few coping strategies for managing anxiety which can easily be implemented by you when you need a little support to bring some calmness into your life.


Not all these ideas will work for everyone, but hopefully from these ideas you can find a few which you can build into your good daily habits.


So, in no particular order…


Breathing

Breathing is the most fundamental thing we can do to not only survive, but to keep anxiety levels controlled and bring some calm to ourselves when all around is moving so fast.

There are many focussed breathing techniques you can use, but two of my favourites are simple yoga breathing - slowly in through the nose and out through the mouth - and ‘4, 7, 8’ breathing. This is when you breath in for 4 beats, hold for 7 and out over 8.


By making your out breath longer than your in breath, you will help slow your heart rate and bring a sense of calm.


Sleep

I cannot tell you how important sleep is for managing your mental health.


After breathing, I think sleep is the most important thing we can do to help our minds and body rest and heal. But some people struggle to sleep well


With a combination of other things I’ve mentioned such as hydration, diet, exercise, breathing exercises, reading and meditation we can all improve our sleep patterns. In the current climate, the best thing we can stockpile is sleep.


Be kind to yourself, embrace emotions

It’s really important to be kind to yourself and not beat yourself up when you’re riding a rollercoaster of emotions.


Supressing emotions can be really detrimental to our mental health and the best thing we can do is let them be, understand them, accept them, let them pass and move on with more resilience.


Cry and laugh when you need to. Never feel bad or self-conscious about feeling happy or sad. Embrace the emotions, be honest with yourself and others about how you feel and share that gem of knowledge with everyone.


Make Yourself Feel Good

Especially when we are deprived of doing what we normally do in terms of going out and taking part in things, do everything you can do to make yourself feel good.


Stay healthy with nutritious food, home exercise regimes, fresh air and hydration and do all you can to make yourself feel good.


Have that pamper session, wear the nice underwear, get dressed up. Even if no-one will see it, this is about making yourself feel good and happy.


Days when I’ve got a great matching underwear set on are days I feel like I’m winning!


For more food and nutrition advice check out The Food Ninja.


Review & reflect

Take time to understand and accept situations, review your current environment and situation and reflect on what has gone and what is, purely as a means to make a conscious decision about how to move forwards in the best way for you.


We don’t and must not reflect to feel sadness and wallow in things that have passed, but by reflecting we can learn and move forwards with strength and resilience.


Humour

Even in the hardest of times, laughter, humour and smiling will help us through so spread that stuff around like glitter.


Find some funny cat videos or your favourite comedian to watch, read a joke book, smile at the person on the other side of the street.


Whatever you do, do it with a smile.


Journaling

Writing things down is a really great way to accept and understand your emotions and feelings with a view to managing anxiety.


Regular journaling, can really help you understand yourself in order to build resilience and the opportunity to write down how you really feel is quite cathartic. The process of reading your words back can also help you to get to grips with your own emotions.


Reading

Losing yourself in a good book does not only help learning, it can help the mind be free and imaginative. It gives your mind permission to step away from its own thoughts and anxieties and to get some much-needed rest.


With so many ways to read and so many different books, reading is a never-ending source of help and support.


I like to have several books on the go at the same time; a mix of autobiographies, self-help, business and novels.


Meditation

Meditation doesn’t mean you have to have the skills and patience of a meditation guru!


Just taking a few minutes to sit quietly with your eyes closed, focus on your breathing and be at one with your thoughts can really help to bring a sense of calm and control anxiety.


There are plenty of guided meditations on YouTube and other similar places, or you can use and app on your phone to assist.


Apps

A couple of great apps for meditation and helping with anxiety are ‘Headspace’ and ‘Calm’.


I use ‘Calm’ not just for the meditations but also the sleep stories meditation lessons.


Headspace has just released some new free content too called ‘Weathering the Storm.’


You can use these (and other) apps for free with in app purchases available.


Mindfulness

Mindfulness does not have to be all ‘woo woo’ but in fact it’s just the appreciation and skill of being in the here and now; not worrying what has gone or what is ahead but just focussing on what is around you right now.


You can be mindful whilst walking, playing or listening to music, cooking, eating and many more ways.


Simply take a moment to appreciate your current surroundings. That could be what you see, taste, hear, touch, smell; utilise all your senses to help ground yourself.


Switch off notifications

Many of us spend a great deal of time on social media and our ‘phones and as we change our habits due to self-isolation, working from home and lockdowns we are likely to find ourselves online more than ever.


In order to manage our anxiety and overwhelm better, it’s advisable to switch off the notifications on your ‘phone so you can be self-disciplined and more in control of your own usage.


Stay away from news

Yes, this is hard, especially as we want to know all the latest breaking news surrounding this global pandemic, but a lot of news stories are sensationalised and this is not good for our anxiety levels.


News is 24/7 these days, but our usage of it doesn’t have to be. Re-order news feeds, switch off notifications and only check in on the news at designated times on your terms. Your anxiety levels will thank you for it.


Surround yourself with uplifting info

Once you’ve made a choice to limit the sensationalised news and stories, surround yourself with uplifting information. Find some great online resources and groups or books and magazines and get involved with as many things that make you smile and feel involved as possible.


Find people and groups who ground you

Staying grounded is key in managing anxiety. Surround yourself with amazing people who will keep you in check, have your health and interests at heart and will be there for you in moments of both joy and crisis.


Having people and groups you trust is paramount, so choose who is best for you and who makes you feel safe and included. Don’t be afraid to talk to these people when you need to and share your feelings and emotions. You are not a burden and your level of understanding could be the kind of non-judgemental listening someone else needs, so be there for each other. Your tribe is everything.


Be a reducer not a producer

Be the person that helps to reduce anxiety and not produce it. You are not alone in things so put all the coping strategies in place to help yourself and this will help reduce the anxiety in yourself and others.


Think what you do have control over

You have control over your choices and your actions. Don’t be led by news and social media hype and panic. Make your own judgements, take the advice of experts and control your choices. By taking charge of your decisions you will be able to limit overwhelm and anxiety and make the best judgements for you.


Is your response appropriate

When everything around you feels chaotic and out of control, the one thing we must control is our response to situations.


It’s so important to ACT and not REACT to things. Choose your response wisely after you’ve asked yourself if your actions or words are necessary, kind and appropriate.


How we act to things helps us keep emotions and anxiety in check.


How can you influence a situation?

Once you have decided on the appropriate response to an event or situation ask yourself how you can influence things positively. Can your knowledge or understanding help someone else to feel better so the mutual support will help you all through?


Try to find ways to think positively and influence a situation for emotional and physical benefit of yourself and others.


Creativity

Creativity is good for the soul. Whether it’s a creative hobby, creative thinking or learning new creative skills, focusing on something creative can help with your mental health.


Music, writing, drawing, painting, colouring-in, sewing, knitting, cooking; there are so many ways to get creative so find your thing.


Create a new routine

We can be a little habitual and often that gives us comfort when trying to manage our anxiety, but the reality is these times call for a tweak to our usual routines, but this doesn’t have to be scary or overwhelming.


First, with the other work we’ve done on our minds in place, we can accept the situation and rationally accept it. We can then prepare to take different measures.


See things as an opportunity; an opportunity to cook different foods, an opportunity to communicate differently and safely with people, an opportunity to build new exercise regimes at home, a new way to work, a new way to school our children.


The best thing about opportunity is that we get to create exactly what works for us, in a way that works for us. So, make small actions and changes and be consistent with them to create new routines and habits.


Goals

It’s good to know that your current situation and feelings will pass and so we are not stuck in the ‘here and now’ but we can look to future plans and goals.


Have a mix of small goals to get you through each moment of each day and some big amazing goals to strive for. Be as creative as you like and make them all exciting.


What’s positive

From every situation, no matter how overwhelming it feels at the time, there will be a positive if you look for it. Finding the positive in a seemingly negative scenario is what can help our anxiety as it gives us hope that things are within our control and understanding.


When anxiety starts to bubble due to the chaos around you, stop and take a moment to step back, view things from every perspective and look for that small glimmer of positivity and then build on it.


What can you learn?

Finally, the most important thing we can do (after breathing and sleeping!) is to learn and develop. Be open to learning about yourself, your emotions and those of other people.


A focus on learning and development can help us manage anxiety because we can see the point in things and understand and accept that everything has purpose and meaning. When we understand that, we can create better coping strategies for ourselves and move forwards with purpose and a renewed vigour.


Just remember you are never alone; together we can support ourselves and each other and I’m always here and happy to help.


Much Love

Tabby xxx


If you want some friendship, online happiness or to join in the conversation to support better mental health and help yourself and others, then hop on over to my page at www.facebook.com/modefor or my #createmyhappy group at www.facebook.com/groups/createmyhappy




The Blog written by Tabby Kerwin focussing on possibility, productivity &  performance, with a focus on resilience, creativity & mental health.